Tag: From Our Lens

From Our Lens : SSTMI – Champion in need of support

9 November 2017 – When we talk about Sekolah Sukan Tunku Mahkota Ismail, each rugby fans across Malaysia knows how important that school is in producing great players that went on to play for Malaysia.

9 out of 12 national players who bag Gold during the 2017 Kuala Lumpur SEA Games are the product of SSTMI. That shows the high quality of the players produce by the coaching and management of this school.

SSTMI is the only school listed as the High-Performance School under the National Rugby Development Program (NRDP) in Malaysia. They match that status by dominating tons of tournament in 2017.

Few could stop SSTMI when they are on song

U19/U20
Plate Runner-up – Asia Rugby Under 20 Sevens Series
Quarter Final – AirAsia Malaysia Rugby League
Champion – National 7s
Semi Final – Langkawi International Rugby 7s
Semi Final – NS Royal 7s
Champion – Arau 7’s

U18
Runner Up – National 7s
Plate Runner Up – Langkawi International Rugby 7s
Bowl Champion – NS Royal 7s
Third Place – Arau 7s

Under 17
Champion – MCKK 7s
Champion – Salbros 7s
Semi Final – Langkawi International Rugby 7s
Bowl Champion – NS Royal 7s

Team U16
Runner Up – Johor Rugby Carnival 7s
Runner Up – NS Royal 7s
Third Place – Arau 7s
Champion – Allied Pickfords 15s
Champion – Super KGV International 10s

7 years old broken tackling bag

Few know that despite all the championship, the rugby team is severely lacking in term of fund and equipment. They still able to join multiple tournaments and won them with the help of parents, friends and rugby fans.

The sky is the limit if this school is well equipped and fund. They could have better preparation with proper equipment. The status of the only high-performance school should be matched.

SSTMI is the reference for all the other rugby school in Malaysia. They also received tons of application to come to their place and train with them and they accepted it with open arms despite all their shortage.

They need something way better than these

It is great to see the coaching team fully utilized what they have. It will be much better to see if they can maximize their potential with proper support from those who supposed to be involved.

Very best of luck SSTMI Tsunami in 2018.

As what those rugby coaches say, “ada ada, tak ada tak ada, anggap selasai”

Photos from Mr Syed Shazril and Zainuddin Mamat/Ragbionline

From Our Lens : Penalise the high tacklers

14 December 2016 – The second match of the day 1 Asia Rugby Championship 2016 saw Sri Lanka Under 19 edged Malaysia Under 19 27 – 21 in the very last minutes of the game. Both team show their willingness to fight and back and fourth action attacking and well defend display created great pleasure to the crowds at the UPM Stadium.

However, one things that struck our attention was the unwillingness for the referee to stop the play and take action for the Dangerous tackles (high tackles). This was especially in the second half of the game as both team came toe to toe to win the game. Numbers of incident which were well captured by our on field photographers on that day saw those tacklers got away after the incident.

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It was the kind of tackle that can cause injury to the opponent, to make things worst, possibly a career ending injury. The referee needs to be more strict in order to make this beautiful game safe enough for the athlete to play and enjoy the match.

“The specific provisions of Law 10.4(e) in relation to High Tackles are as follows:

A player must not tackle (or try to tackle) an opponent above the line of the shoulders even if the tackle starts below the line of the shoulders. A tackle around the opponent’s neck or head is dangerous play.A stiff-arm tackle is dangerous play. A player makes a stiff-arm tackle when using a stiff-arm to strike an opponent.

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At an IRB Medical Conference held in November 2010 at Lensbury the results of studies related to injuries sustained as a result of tackles were outlined. A study in England concluded that “stricter implementation of the Laws of Rugby relating to collisions and tackles above the line of the shoulder may reduce the number of head/neck injuries”.A separate study in New Zealand concluded that “ball carriers were at highest risk from tackles to the head and neck region”.
The participants at the Medical Conference generally recognised that tackles above the line of the shoulders have the potential to cause serious injury and noted that a trend had emerged whereby players responsible for such tackles were not being suitably sanctioned.

The purpose of this Memorandum is to emphasise that as with tip tackles, they must be dealt with severely by Referees and all those involved in the off-field disciplinary process.

It is recognised of course, as with other types of illegal and/or foul play, depending on the circumstances of the high tackle, the range of sanctions extends from a penalty kick to the player receiving a red card. An illegal high tackle involving a stiff arm or swinging arm to the head of the opponent, with no regard to the player’s safety, bears all the hallmarks of an action which should result in a red card or a yellow card being seriously considered.

Referees and Citing Commissioners should not make their decisions based on what they consider was the intention of the offending player. Their decision should be based on an objective assessment (as per Law 10.4(e)) of the overall circumstances of the tackle.”

Extract from http://laws.worldrugby.org/?domain=9&guideline=3&language=EN

Photos : Zainuddin Mamat and Muizzuddin Yahaya – ragbionline